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20120901
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Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7 (some duplicates have been removed)
to government cyber and wisdom sitting next to secret service agents and fbi agents so they're all sharing the information in near real-time, machine to machine speed, not necessarily just human to human. so they can get that overall operational picture to identify cyber risk. and then it becomes actionable because the energy sector person sits there and says, that's important to me in this way, and i need that information to protect my sector which may be different than what the water person sees. so than by doing that and collecting and sharing classified information them unclassified information, per type -- proprietary information, we have a better idea of what activity is and how the activity propagates through these various sectors. so it's something that can be enhanced. is something that can be expanded on that is something that currently exists. >> so that is an effective system, capability to provide the very similar information sharing to what congress would like to legislate. is there an awareness problem? >> i think it's an evolutionary problem. so we started the capability, a
for fbi, not cia. okay? this is a job for the michigan state police, not the department of defense. okay. by the way, by and large most of the information we knew, okay, we knew about umar farouk abdulmutallab, the guy coming into detroit was all foreign derived. i think it was mistake to mirandize him in 50 minutes because our base of him is foreign intelligence. to me the right entry point was, enemy combatant, nation at war, deal with it that way. on the other hand if someone is discovered and prevented in an attack in the united states by the fbi the roots of that information are law enforcement derived. the going in position is we ought to treat this as a law enforcement problem and enter this into the american court system. i suppose if we stayed her long enough we could think of exceptions but in broad measure my sense is that is how we should deal with it. i hope made it worth your while coming here this afternoon. i hope you have left with more questions than you had when you came in. that was my intent. and thank you very much for the opportunity. and, go air force. [applause]
in benghazi? and to that, the fbi says it is too dangerous to be in benghazi why none of them are there now. is that because the situation has worsened or was the always that dangerous in benghazi? >> i think, on the terrorist attack i mean, as we determined the details of what took place there, and how that, attack took place, that it became clear that there were terrorists who had planned that attack and that's when i came to that conclusion. as again, as to who was involved, what specific groups were involved, i think the investigation that is ongoing hopefully will determine that. >> a day after or, was -- >> took a while to really get some of the feedback from what exactly happened at that location. >> there was a thread of intelligence reporting that that groups in the environment in western, correction, eastern libya were seeking to coalesce but there wasn't anything specific and certainly not a specific threat to the consulate that i'm aware of. and, as far as to the risks that the fbi reported to you, really have to ask them for why they made that determination. i don't know. >> wa
partners including the fbi. the intelligence community is devoting more resources to identifying trafficking networks. it strengthened protection so that foreign-born workers know their rights. and most of all we are going after the traffickers. new anti-trafficking teams are dismantling their networks. last year we charged a record number of these predators with human trafficking. we are putting them where they belong, behind bars. [applause] but with more than 20 million victims of human trafficking around the world, think about that, more than 20 million, we have got a lot more to do. and that is why earlier this year i directed my to increase their efforts and today i can announce a series of additional steps that we are going to take. first we are going to do more to spot it and stop it. we will prepare a new assessment of human trafficking in the united states until we better understand the scope in the scale of the problem. we will strengthen training so investigators and law enforcement are even better equipped to take action and treat victims as victims, not as criminals
and the fbi, and lying about and thrown overboard his closest aides one after another in an attempt to save himself. so that was an astonishing time. i do think that we learned a lot about hubris during the course of watergate and we have to be on constant alert for as for the most intriguing president, it will be impossible for me to say. they all brought such interesting qualities to the job. it's the hardest thing in the world to do, is to run successfully for president. a lot of people have not been successful, and it's in part because they simply were not up to it. those who eventually get to the oval office, however successful or unsuccessful they may have been in her administration, always bring unique qualities to the assignment of being a candidate. >> host: where we on august 9, 1974? >> guest: the white house lawn. i was in san clemente when the supreme court decision came down, and -- >> host: with the president. >> guest: with the president. he was out there at the time but it was an explosive development. we in effect knew it was over at that point, because if the tapes were c
, high-ranking member of the f.b.i., director of national intelligence, general clapper and the vice chairman of the joint chiefs of staff to tell us ostensibly what happened in the tragic death of christopher -- ambassador christopher stevens and three other brave americans. so we gathered down in the secret room, which everybody turns in their phones and blackberries, and we went in and listened to basically a description of america's military disposition in that part of the world, something which certainly does not warrant a super secret briefing. but more importantly than that, when the secretary and the others were asked exactly what happened, what happened here, what caused this tragedy? what was the sequence of events? in fact, it was senators, the ranking member of the intelligence committee, what happened? the answer was, well, that's still an ongoing investigation, and we can't tell you anything. we were supposed to be down there to hear what happened, to hear the administration's version of events of what happened. we were told nothing. we were told absolutely nothing. and
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7 (some duplicates have been removed)

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